DJI halts selling STEM products, courses and robotic contests to K12 students

In the future, the company will halt all robotic competitions catering to K12-stage students within China. Instead, the focus will shift toward hosting collegiate robotic and drone contests, DJI said.

DJI (大疆科技), the world’s largest drone maker, stopped selling its STEM-related products, AI courses and edtech solutions to underage Chinese students on December 31, 2023, Chinese media reported today.

The Shenzhen-based tech giant released a statement last month saying that it will cease the sale of Tello edu, RoboMaster EP, AI kit, DJI education and AI scenario-based education solutions by the end of 2023.

In an interview with National Business Daily, an economic newspaper, DJI explained that the decision was made based on a comprehensive assessment of its “investment and optimal allocation of business resources.”

In the future, the company will halt all robotic competitions catering to K12-stage students within China. Instead, the focus will shift toward hosting collegiate robotic and drone contests, DJI said.

The goal is to “set the stage for youth engineers to grow” and “cultivate and coach a young, promising team of science and engineering talent,” so as to “continue to contribute to society.”

DJI’s STEM packages include multiple robots and drones, AI programming on Python and Swift, among others.

STEM education is an immense market in China. According to a study by LeadLeo, a market intelligence researcher, the STEM industry in China is forecast to be valued at 54 billion yuan (US$7.55 billion) by 2023.

It’s unclear if DJI’s latest move has anything to do with China’s “Dual Reduction” crackdown on after-school tutoring, which aims to lessen the academic burden on students from the 1st through the 12th grade.

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Ni Tao

Ni Tao is the founder and editor-in-chief of cnrobopedia. Prior to cnrobopedia, he had a full decade of experience with a major state-run English-language newspaper as a tech reporter and opinion writer. He is also a communications specialist, having provided consultancy services to established firms like Siemens, Philips, ABinBev, Diageo, Trip.com Group (Nasdaq: TCOM, HK: 9961), Jianpu Technology (NYSE: JT) and a handful of domestic startups. A graduate of Fudan University, he writes widely about China's business and tech scenes and other topics for global publications including South China Morning Post, SupChina, The Diplomat, CGTN, Banking Technology, among others, and tries to impart his experience to students at Fudan University Journalism School, where he is a part-time lecturer. When he's not writing about robotics, you can expect him to be on his beloved Yanagisawa saxophones, trying to play some jazz riffs, often in vain and occasionally against the protests of an angry neighbor. Get in touch with him by dropping a line at nitao0927@gmail.com.

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