DJI secures coveted Remote ID license from FAA to sell delivery drone FlyCart 30 in US

The acquisition of the Remote ID means that American regulators, specifically FAA, had given the greenlight for the tech giant to sell FlyCart 30 in the US market.

FlyCart 30, the first delivery drone model developed by the world’s drone leader DJI (大疆科技), has landed a Remote ID Declaration of Compliance from the US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA).

According to media reports, DJI had filed paperwork with the Federal Communications Commissions to take their contraption to the North American market a few weeks earlier.

Remote ID is deemed crucial for any drone manufacturer to be able to legally sell their product in the US market.

It is a feature that enables a drone in action to supply its identification and location information to civil aviation authorities, so that they know where to find it in the case of spotting some safety risks.

They will be able to locate the drone through this Remote ID mechanism, should it become wayward in its flight path or stray into no-fly zones. Hence Remote ID is occasionally compared to a license plate for UAVs.

The acquisition of the Remote ID means that American regulators, specifically FAA, had given the greenlight for the tech giant to sell FlyCart 30 in the US market.

cnrobopedia reported in mid-August that DJI unveiled FlyCart 30, its first-generation civilian drone model for aerial transportation.

Powered by a dual-battery pack, this quadcopter with eight propellers has a capacity of 30kg and can remain airborne for 18 minutes.

When fully loaded and working in a dual-battery mode, the range will fall from 28km to 16km. FlyCart 30 is priced at 125,000 yuan in its home market.

Its first publicly known use case is in a scenic resort in Huangshan of eastern China’s Anhui Province. Operators fly two such drones to carry cargo like essentials, hotel supplies and daily garbage from and onto the mountaintop.

This significantly lowered the physical burden on human employees.

For some of the other specs of the drone, please refer to this earlier cnrobopedia story.

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Ni Tao

Ni Tao is the founder and editor-in-chief of cnrobopedia. Prior to cnrobopedia, he had a full decade of experience with a major state-run English-language newspaper as a tech reporter and opinion writer. He is also a communications specialist, having provided consultancy services to established firms like Siemens, Philips, ABinBev, Diageo, Trip.com Group (Nasdaq: TCOM, HK: 9961), Jianpu Technology (NYSE: JT) and a handful of domestic startups. A graduate of Fudan University, he writes widely about China's business and tech scenes and other topics for global publications including South China Morning Post, SupChina, The Diplomat, CGTN, Banking Technology, among others, and tries to impart his experience to students at Fudan University Journalism School, where he is a part-time lecturer. When he's not writing about robotics, you can expect him to be on his beloved Yanagisawa saxophones, trying to play some jazz riffs, often in vain and occasionally against the protests of an angry neighbor. Get in touch with him by dropping a line at nitao0927@gmail.com.

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