Monarch surgical tool from Johnson & Johnson lands permit for use in China

This development also made Monarch the first minimally invasive RAS platform for medical procedures on lungs and bronchus to be officially licensed in China.

China’s National Medical Product Administration has granted a certificate to the Monarch surgical platform of Johnson & Johnson MedTech, setting the ground for the innovation to tap the immense Chinese market, Chinese media reported recently.

The regulatory greenlight signals that Monarch, a robot-assisted surgical (RAS) platform for peripheral lung biopsy, is now eligible for adoption in China for clinical operation.

This development also made Monarch the first minimally invasive RAS platform for medical procedures on lungs and bronchus to be officially licensed in China.

The certification is also a milestone for Johnson & Johnson’s medical unit outside the United States. Previously, Monarch only secured the FDA approval in its home market.

Johnson & Johnson acquired Auris Health, a medtech firm that’s behind the invention of Monarch, for US$3.4 billion in 2019, paving the way for its entry into the booming surgical robot market.

Monarch came out with a purpose to uncover visual treatment pathways for procedures on adult patients’ lungs, bronchus and windpipe, so as to aid diagnostics and treatment.

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Ni Tao

Ni Tao is the founder and editor-in-chief of cnrobopedia. Prior to cnrobopedia, he had a full decade of experience with a major state-run English-language newspaper as a tech reporter and opinion writer. He is also a communications specialist, having provided consultancy services to established firms like Siemens, Philips, ABinBev, Diageo, Trip.com Group (Nasdaq: TCOM, HK: 9961), Jianpu Technology (NYSE: JT) and a handful of domestic startups. A graduate of Fudan University, he writes widely about China's business and tech scenes and other topics for global publications including South China Morning Post, SupChina, The Diplomat, CGTN, Banking Technology, among others, and tries to impart his experience to students at Fudan University Journalism School, where he is a part-time lecturer. When he's not writing about robotics, you can expect him to be on his beloved Yanagisawa saxophones, trying to play some jazz riffs, often in vain and occasionally against the protests of an angry neighbor. Get in touch with him by dropping a line at nitao0927@gmail.com.

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